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Ways to celebrate Pride Month in Indianapolis

Here are events, things to remember, and things you can do this Pride Month.
Posted at 1:11 PM, Jun 07, 2021
and last updated 2021-06-07 13:14:52-04

INDIANAPOLIS — Pride began as a riot. In June 1970, the first official Pride parades in New York City, San Francisco, Chicago, and Los Angeles were held to commemorate the 1969 Stonewall Riots, one year earlier.

Now, decades later, cities and towns from coast to coast, including Indianapolis, celebrate and recognize Pride Month and the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, non-binary and queer (LGBTQ) community.

June is both a time to celebrate, learn and remember where our society has been when it comes to social acceptance and legal rights for the LGBTQ community.

Here are ways for central Indiana Hoosiers to celebrate Pride Month and things to keep in mind.

Events & Things To Do:

Dates to Remember

June 12, 2016: Pulse Nightclub Shooting

June 26: Same-Sex marriage was legalized — and much more has happened on this historic day over the years for LGBTQ rights.

June 28, 1969: Stonewall Riots

Terms and things to keep in mind

Basic LGBTQIA+ Terms to Learn in Honor of Pride Month

Cisgender: Applies to someone whose gender matches their “assigned” sex at birth.

Transgender: Applies to a person whose gender is different from their “assigned” sex at birth. Doctors typically assign gender based on sexual organs, but sex and gender are different.

Non-binary: Non-binary, similar to genderqueer, is a spectrum of gender identities that are not exclusively masculine or exclusively feminine‍—‌identities that are outside the gender binary of male and female.

Genderqueer: Similar to “non-binary” – some people regard “queer” as offensive, others embrace it.

Genderfluid: Applies to a person whose gender identity changes over time or changes at different times.

Most readily available pronouns:

  • She/Her
  • He/Him
  • They/Them
  • Ze/Zee
  • Some people don’t want to use pronouns at all and will ask you to refer to them by their name alone.

By first sharing your pronouns it invites others to feel they can share their pronouns in a welcoming space.

Coming Out:

"Coming Out" is the process a person took to acknowledge, accept and share their sexual identity with others.

Contact WRTV Real-Time Digital Editor Shakkira Harris at shakkira.harris@wrtv.com or on Twitter: @shakkirasays.