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Special prosecutor named in drunken driving case against Zionsville town council president

Posted at 5:41 PM, Oct 18, 2017

ZIONSVILLE, Ind. -- A special prosecutor will handle the drunken driving charges filed last month against Zionsville Town Council President Elizabeth Hopper, per a decision by Judge Bruce Petit this week.

Court documents show Boone County Prosecutor Todd Meyer’s office filed a request for a special prosecutor last Friday.

Petit granted that request on Monday, assigning Shelby County Prosecutor James B. Landwerlen to the case.

In an email to RTV6, Meyer said he requested the special prosecutor because of past interactions with Hopper and her husband.

“I am familiar with Ms. Hopper and her husband, who is an attorney, and I occasionally go in front of the Zionsville Town Council for funding requests for my office,” Meyer said. “That said, I felt it was appropriate for my office to step aside in order to avoid any appearance of impropriety.”

Hopper was arrested last month on suspicion of driving while intoxicated following a police stop near the intersection of Hunt Club and Ford roads.

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According to a probable cause affidavit filed in the case, a Zionsville police officer smelled the odor alcohol beverages on Hopper and noticed she had the heat on “full blast,” even though it was 90 degrees outside.

Hopper allegedly failed a field sobriety test and was then asked to take a portable breathalyzer test, which registered her BAC at .19. A certified breath test at the police department later determined her to have a BAC of .221, according to police.

Hopper is being represented in the case by Jennifer Lukemeyer, of the Indianapolis law firm Voyles Vaiana Lukemeyer Baldwin & Webb.

Court records show Lukemeyer filed a motion asking for a specialized driving permit to be issued to her client while the  case proceeds.

Indiana law allows for drivers with suspended licenses to be issued a 180-day permit allowing them to drive under certain conditions determined by a judge. Those conditions can include only being allowed to drive during the day, between specific locations and with the use of an ignition interlock device.

A hearing on that motion was scheduled for Oct. 26.

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