NewsLocal News

Actions

Future firefighters now have their own tower to train on

Dedicated Monday at Tech High School
WRTV-Default-Image_1280x720.png
Posted at 12:36 PM, Sep 16, 2019
and last updated 2019-09-16 12:36:10-04

INDIANAPOLIS—Arsenal Tech High School students considering a career as a firefighter have a new training tool, right on campus at the east side Indianapolis school.

A training drill tower for the school's Fire and Rescue program was dedicated Monday.

"This training tower is a valuable tool that will help take an already innovative approach to firefighter education, recruitment and training to the next level, both for the department and IPS students," said Indianapolis Fire Chief Ernest Malone." "We are pleased to be part of an effort that's helping to prepare students for success after graduation, regardless of the career field they choose."

According to IPS Communications Manager Carrie Cline Black, "The drill tower was made possible thanks to an initiative by Chief Malone and highlights the important partnership between the Indianapolis Fire Department, Indianapolis Professional Firefighters Local 416, the City of Indianapolis and Indianapolis Public Schools."

The IPS Fire and Rescue program at Tech has been around since 2012 and provides juniors and seniors a chance to train like firefighters, learning many of the same skills that are taught at the fire department's training academy, including engine and ladder operations, aerial climbs, advancement of hose lines, CPR and hazardous materials operations. Students who successfully complete the program receive nine college credits.

"IPS is grateful for the state-of-the-art drill tower, donated by IFD and Local 416, to be used for student training purposes," said IPS Superintendent Aleesia Johnson. "The tower will enhance our already prominent program by providing lifelike, real-time training, while also helping our students develop critical workforce ready skills like problem-solving and collaboration that will lay a foundation for lifelong success."

More than 100 students have gone through the program since 2012.