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Indianapolis Zoo provides update on sick elephant Kedar

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Posted at 4:52 PM, May 13, 2019

INDIANAPOLIS — The Indianapolis Zoo on Monday said 13-year-old African elephant Kedar continues to be critical after he contracted a deadly virus that killed two other elephants at the zoo in March.

According to zoo officials, animal care and veterinary teams are with him around the clock and are providing treatment including antiviral medication and fluids. Zoo officials said Kedar is eating, drinking and has been able to sleep.

"The Indianapolis Zoo is in constant communication with our colleagues and other experts across the country who have experience with this virus," the zoo said in a statement. "The team is applying every bit of knowledge, effort and resources we have to battling this virus. In addition to caring for Kedar, staff are carefully monitoring the other elephants in the herd."

PREVIOUS COVERAGE | Third Indianapolis Zoo elephant contracts deadly virus that has killed two this year | Second Indy Zoo elephant dies |Indy Zoo mourns loss of 6-year-old African elephant, Nyah

Kedar’s condition continues to be critical. Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesvirus (EEHV) is unforgiving and aggressive, striking Asian and African elephants in the wild, in sanctuaries and in zoos. We are very grateful for everyone’s kindness and healing thoughts for Kedar and will continue to provide updates on any changes in his condition.

The male elephant is confirmed to have tested positive for the Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesvirus (EEHV) this week, the same virus that killed Nyah and Kalina.

The EEHV virus causes fatal hemorrhagic in elephants, mainly Asian elephants, according to the zoo. Due to the illness being uncommon in African elephants, there was not a protocol at hand for the Indianapolis Zoo veterinarians.

This particular virus has multiple strains with high fatality rates and is one of the most devastating viral diseased in elephants worldwide in zoos, sanctuaries and the wild.

"Kedar’s condition continues to be critical," the zoo said in a statement. "Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpesvirus (EEHV) is unforgiving and aggressive, striking Asian and African elephants in the wild, in sanctuaries and in zoos. We are very grateful for everyone’s kindness and healing thoughts for Kedar and will continue to provide updates on any changes in his condition."