News and HeadlinesIndianapolis Local News

Actions

Indy's first-of-its-kind glow in the dark trail

Ignacio Watlington and paco
Pogue's Run glowing
Pogue's Run in the daytime
Bob Musgrove
Pogue's Run Trail
Posted at 7:31 AM, Jun 26, 2024

INDIANAPOLIS — Pogue’s Run Trail is the first of its kind for the city of Indianapolis.

That’s because the pathway is covered in a glow in the dark stone.

It’s a route Paco and his owner Ignacio Watlington take twice a day, or whenever mom says so.

Ignacio Watlington and paco

The Watlington family recently moved to the Springdale neighborhood.

He says he feels safe using the trail system.

“My dog is so uncontrollable. He’s very unorthodox. At least with the trail I have a boundary where I can walk. If I was walking him on the street, he would like run away," Watlington said.

Pogue's Run Trail runs 5.3 miles from the Art and Nature Park to the Indianapolis Cultural Trail and the Monon Trail at 10th Street.

Indianapolis Department of Public Works representative Corey Ohlenkamp says the trails helps build inter-connectivity throughout the city.

Pogue's Run Trail

“These different systems will all link into each other in one facet or another," Ohlenkamp said. “We know that the best way to provide a safe route around the city is to keep folks completely off the roadways and trail networks provide a great opportunity to get people where they wanna go."

The City of Indianapolis invested $7.4 million into construction of the Pogue’s Run Trail.

Pogue's Run in the daytime

Funding was a part of Mayor Joe Hogsett's Circle City Forward investment, the City-County Council voted in the third quarter of 2021 to approve a fiscal ordinance in the amount of $25 million for the design and/or construction of nine trail and greenway projects.

A part of that investment is glow stone work, which is an homage to the multi-colored glass cullet path that used to be there in the mid 1900's from Marietta Glass Factory at 16th and Sherman.

Pogue's Run glowing

“It really helps incorporate the flavor of the neighborhood and character and history of Indianapolis into the trail network system,:" Ohlenkamp said.

The stones are embedded into the asphalt, and light up for walkers and bikers at night.

Lifelong Springdale resident and frequent trail user Bob Musgrove says he appreciates the illumination.

Bob Musgrove

“It’s kinda like the yellow brick road. When you see it, it lights up you can see how it winds around," Musgrove said.

A portion of the trail with be closed for rehab work, including a new pedestrian bridge.

Phase two of the trail is expected to be completed mid-July.