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Dogs brought to Indy after being rescued from South Korean meat market

149 dogs rescued from South Korean meat market
149 dogs rescued from South Korean meat market
149 dogs rescued from South Korean meat market
149 dogs rescued from South Korean meat market
Posted at 4:05 PM, Jul 20, 2017
and last updated 2017-07-21 08:08:32-04

INDIANAPOLIS -- Four dogs that were rescued from a dog meat farm in rural South Korea by the Humane Society International will be cared for at the Indy Humane Society.

A total of 149 dogs were taken from a farm in Yesa, South Korea where they were being raised so they could be sold to a nearby meat market.  

As part of South Korea’s “Bok Nal” summer season, more than a million dogs are killed and eaten as a spicy soup called bosintang, which is believed to improve stamina and virility. It’s during that three-day festival, which falls during the three hottest days of the summer according to the lunar calendar, that 70-80 percent of dog meat is eaten in Korea.

The closing of the farm in Yesan marks the ninth dog meat farm that the Humane Society International has permanently closed since 2014. Nearly 1,000 dogs have been rescued and rehomed through the process.

The Humane Society of Indianapolis will receive and care for the 4 dogs and puppies, which will be evaluated by IndyHumane’s veterinary team and provided with necessary medical care and treatment until they are ready to go to their forever homes. The rest of the dogs are being taken in by 12 different rescues across the U.S.

Interested adopters can keep watch at indyhumane.org. Available dogs will be posted here once deemed ready.

“IndyHumane participates in The Humane Society of the United States’ Emergency Placement Partner program,” Steven Stolen, IndyHumane’s CEO, said. “Our shelter has outstanding professionals and the medical and behavioral resources necessary to help transform these dogs’ lives and provide them with a second chance. We’re grateful that our resources allow us to assist with this international program by responding to crises and rescues, while also continuing to help local animals in need.”