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Study: 78% of adults either believe or aren't sure about at least one common COVID-19 misconception

COVID-19 misinformaiton
Posted at 12:01 PM, Nov 09, 2021
and last updated 2021-11-09 12:01:06-05

A new study conducted by the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) indicates that misinformation about COVID-19 and vaccines is still prevalent throughout the U.S.

According to the study, 78% of adults in the U.S. either believe or aren't sure about one at least one of eight commonly-shared misguided theories or outright conspiracies about the pandemic.

KFF's study found that those who are not vaccinated against COVID-19 were more than three times more likely to believe false statements than vaccinated people. The divide also fell along political lines — nearly half of Republicans believe or were unsure about common misconceptions about the pandemic, compared to just 14% of Democrats.

The study also found that those who believed or weren't sure about COVID-19 conspiracies tended to place more trust in conservative news sources, particularly Newsmax and One America News. Those who trusted network news, NPR, CNN and MSNBC were less likely to believe pandemic falsehoods.

Below are the common misconceptions about the pandemic KFF asked respondents about. All of the statements below are false.

  • The government is exaggerating the number of COVID-19 deaths — 38% believe it to be true; 22% have heard it but aren't sure if it's true
  • Pregnant women should not get the COVID-19 vaccine — 17% believe it to be true; 22% have heard it but aren't sure if it's true
  • COVID-19 deaths are being intentionally hidden by the government — 8% believe it to be true; 23% have heard it but aren't sure if it's true
  • Ivermectin is a safe and effective COVID-19 treatment — 14% believe it to be true; 14% have heard it but aren't sure if it's true
  • You can get COVID-19 from the vaccine — 14% believe it to be true; 10% have heard it but aren't sure if it's true
  • COVID-19 vaccines contain a microchip — 7% believe it to be true; 17% have heard it but aren't sure if it's true
  • COVID-19 vaccines change a person's DNA — 8% believe it to be true; 13% have heard it but aren't sure if it's true

Click here to read more about the KFF's study.