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Black Lives Matter mural boards to go to Indiana State Museum

Posted at 9:29 AM, Aug 06, 2020
and last updated 2020-08-07 12:15:20-04

INDIANAPOLIS — The weeks of people taking to the streets of Indianapolis demanding change through marches or art will stand the test of time.

Boards painted by Black artists that have covered windows for months since protesters filled Indianapolis streets will now have a new home at the Indiana State Museum.

"This is an opportunity for us to be sure that people who may not have been downtown at this juncture, but will as we move forward, will be able to really understand a place in a time of what's happening," Cathy Ferree, CEO and president of the Indiana State Museum, said.

Ferree says the museum is working on a new exhibit to showcase the artwork that lined the streets during this time in our history.

The exhibit will be displayed at the museum's Legacy Center which is a free exhibit.

"We really kind of want to immerse you in this idea of the feelings that are being evoked through these incredible murals," Ferree said.

"It really will be an experience rather than an exhibit," Ferree continued. "Have a chance to sort of wrap your head around what might be happening, really. This is a time for people to be introspective about what they can do with it; might be able to do to help make a difference, and we feel like this will be a place where people can have an opportunity to take that moment."

Kristin Kohn, the owner of Silver in the City, said she supports the move of the murals to the state museum.

"I love it, and I think it's appropriate, and you know I hope I'm around in 25 years to visit it," Kohn said.

Kohn had boards that once covered her store, highlighting the names of Black people who have died at the hands of police brutality or racist acts.

"I didn't want to just have boards, you know. To me, it was less about protecting the business and more about making sure that the focus remains on the reasons for the protests that were happening," Kohn said.

Now her boards are down and will have a new home at the museum - something she calls a powerful moment for her and her staff.

"Knowing what you know now, they're in safekeeping; they're going to be preserved, their names will not be forgotten, that just means so much to me," Kohn said.

The Indiana State Museum doesn't have an exact date just yet on when the exhibit will be open, but they do want you to know you can come in and enjoy what they have on display now, safely. Masks are required, and other safety precautions are followed as well.

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